Caroni.
News

Rum Journal: A Legendary Rum From A Lost Trinidad Distillery

By: Caribbean Journal Staff - July 22, 2017

If you’re lucky, if you’re there at just the right moment before dusk takes its evening bow, you can see a glimmer of something wonderful.

A flock of scarlet ibis birds flashes out of nowhere, a speckling of bright red in the green mangroves of Trinidad’s Caroni Swamp.

Photo by Bryan Naidu.

It’s a daily moment in Trinidad, an hour and place that bring visitors from around the world.

It’s not too far from here that Italian Luca Gargano found something on a trip to the island in 2004: the last glimmer of some legendary Caribbean rum.

A little more than a year after the old Caroni rum distillery had closed its doors, Gargano discovered that inside the old-state owned facility were hundreds of barrels of Caroni’s aging “heavy” rum, some dating back three decades.

Gargano, the owner of Velier, a specialty spirits importer that has made an art form of discovering rare and seemingly unobtainable old spirits (including rum), was able to acquire the rums and eventually bottle them, a treasure trove of rum archaeology.

Rum Journal was lucky enough to obtain a bottle, which is available in limited supply on the global market, including in the United States.

RJ tried the Caroni 17-year Old Rum, a 1998 vintage rum bottled at the end of 2015.

Housed in a beautiful bottle with a replica of a 1940s-era rum label, the 17-year has an alluring amber color and a funky, robust aroma of caramel and dried apricot and a hint of smoke; the moment you smell it you know you’ve found something very, very special.

The flavor profile is at first quite spicy before quickly rounding off into notes of dried mango, citrus peel, apricot and banana. Then come smoky suggestions of black pepper and oak.

The luxurious finish is perhaps the most remarkable quality: it seems to go on forever, somehow hinting at permanence.

Bottled at 55 percent ABV, this is no ordinary rum.

With each sip, the legend grows. But more special is the notion that this is truly a limited rum — it is the unearthing of a lost rum that will never be made again.

It’s the kind of thing that should be enjoyed every day, just at the edge of dusk.

That is, until it’s gone forever.

— CJ

Popular Posts belize hotel mayan world

At the Falling Leaves Lodge in Belize, a Portal to the Maya World

SAN IGNACIO — There has been some form of settlement on this site for more than 3,000 years, here on a leafy hill above the town of San Ignacio, Belize. In other words, this is no ordinary hill. This is Cahal Pech, […]


In San Ignacio, Belize, The Art of Adventure (And Pupusas)

pupusas belize

The sizzle is calling you. In the early morning, corn tortillas stuffed with cheese and beans and meat sing a particularly strong siren song.  It could be that perfect blend of dough and heat, or the aroma. It might just […]


Delta Is Adding More Nonstop Curacao Flights, Citing “Booming Demand”  

the beach at the avila hotel in curacao

Curacao is hotter than ever, with a wave of new hotels and record-breaking tourism numbers. And just a few months after Delta made its long-awaited return to the island, the carrier is adding even more flights.  The reason? What Delta […]


Related Posts belize photo caribbean colorful sky yellow and pink

Caribbean Photo of the Week: A Colorful Sky in Belize City

The latest Caribbean Photo comes from Caribbean Journal reader Beat Muller, who sent in this stunning shot of a colorful sky in Belize City, Belize. Have you taken a great photo in the Caribbean? Send it to news@caribjournal.com with CPOTW […]


Why Zemi Beach House Is the Best Resort in Anguilla Right Now 

the beach on Shoal Bay with palm trees

It feels like Damian is reading our minds. Whatever we need, whether a fruit skewer or a perfectly-timed rum punch, just seems to appear out of thin air.  The wonderfully attentive Damian is part of the team at Zemi Beach […]


A New Way to Fly From Europe to the Dominican Republic

air europa

It’s no secret that the vast majority of travelers to the Dominican Republic come from the United States and Canada, mostly drawn by the country’s overwhelming number of large all-inclusive resorts.  It’s a formula for success that has shown no […]


SUBSCRIBE!

Sign up for Caribbean Journal's free newsletter for a daily dose of beaches, hotels, rum and the best Caribbean travel information on the net.


No. Thank You