Arts & Culture

Willis and the Illest: Bahamian Reggae

 Above: Willis and the Illest (Photo: Dante Carrer) Since 2008, Willis and the Illest have been turning Nassau’s music scene on its head with their own brand of reggae from the Bahamas. The group, which is led by vocalist and …

In the Bahamas, Chantal Bethel Prays for Haiti through Art

 By Alexander Britell NASSAU – At Nassau’s Vincent D’Aguilar Art Foundation, a gallery that is one of the great new spaces of the quickly-growing Bahamian arts scene, Haitian artist Chantal Bethel is producing “Poto Mitan,” a three-dimensional production of work …

Cuba’s Forgotten Art Schools

 This article originally appeared in Untapped Cities. By Albert José-Antonio López Twelve years have passed since Princeton Architectural Press first published John Loomis’s Revolution of Forms: Cuba’s Forgotten Art Schools. In the time that has passed since its humble introduction to the …

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 Mario C is one of Jamaica’s top dancehall producers – winning the EME Award for Dancehall Producer of the Year and well known for his collaborations – from Beenie Man to Lady Saw. But now he has a new project …

 By Alexander Britell While Cuban cigars are renowned the world over for their quality and their history, the process of how Cuban cigars are made – and just what they mean to the Cuban people – have remained largely unexplored, …

 Above: Prefete Duffaut, Habour/Vue de Jacmel avec le Pont de Noel, 1968, oil on canvas (Photo by Jason Mandella) By Alexander Britell Beginning Jun. 12, New York’s El Museo del Barrio will put Caribbean art in the spotlight, with Caribbean: …

 By Alexander Britell Tarrus Riley is one of the leading lights of reggae music today, who led the BBC to call him “Jamaica’s brightest hope” on the release of his previous album, “Contagious,” in 2009. The Bronx-born Jamaican stays true …

 By Alexander Britell One of Jamaica’s foremost media specialists, Dr Marcia Forbes has most recently been exploring the ways technology impacts Jamaican society and culture. Her first book, Music, Media & Adolescent Sexuality in Jamaica, looked at the ways traditional …

 Bahamian native Chris “Kazi” Rolle was touring with a film and music group focusing on developing the creativity of young hip-hop artists. What began as a developmental programme became something else, as Rolle began engaging with the artists about more …

 By Lincoln Depradine Grenada is mourning the loss of national icon Aunty Tek Phillip, a renowned folklorist who died yesterday at the age of 85. “The death of Aunty Tek is a monumental loss to our cultural community,” said Sen. …

 Background, from left: Philip Cooper, chairman; Minister Charles Maynard; Deputy to the Governor General, Frank Watson; Linda Moxey-Brown, Director of Culture; and Silbert Ferguson. Standing left to right: Eddison Dames, Colon Curry, Theopilus Ferguson, Kevin Rahming, Wellington Moultrie, and a …

 Above: CARIFESTA in 2006 in Port of Spain (Photo: CARICOM) By the Caribbean Journal staff CARIFESTA, the Caribbean festival of the creative and performing arts, will return after what will have been a five-year hiatus, with Suriname hosting the event …

 By Lincoln Depradine The weekend had barely ended but cultural officials already had begun making preparations to create additional avenues for displaying Grenada’s traditional folk culture. They have expressed deep satisfaction with the crowd attendance and the artists’ performances at …

 Above: Popopstudios in Nassau (Artwork pictured: Homerun, by John Cox from the “Negative Space” exhibition) By the Caribbean Journal staff A new exhibition to open in the Bahamas Dec. 8 will take a photographic look at the theme of deception. …

 By Lincoln Depradine Brother Valentino, one of the world’s calypso legends, will be returning home to Grenada for a weekend of entertainment in St Patrick, the country’s northernmost parish, in next week. Valentino will be joined by Black Stalin and …

 Author Carine Fabius’ literary career has spanned the globe – from an examination of the cross-cultural relationships in France to a look at how indigenous tribes in the Amazon adorn their bodies with the juice of a fruit called the …

 Emerging from Kingston’s Trenchtown in the 1970s, Big Youth became one of the pioneers of reggae – as arguably one of the first deejays and, as he says, the first Rastafarian to do so. In a four-decade career, in which …

 In a short time, Jamaica’s Dubtonic Kru have made their mark on reggae, topped by winning the Global Battle of the Bands competition in Malaysia in February, taking home the title of best new band in the world. Dubtonic Kru’s …